Building #33, Dave’s Cross Bike

Deciding what components to hang on my new Maietta could have been a daunting task, there are so many options out there for drive trains, bars, stem, saddles, pedals, etc… but after a few seasons of racing cyclocross and playing with several different component combinations, I’ve settled around a group of rock solid parts that I can rely on for training and racing.
Rounding out the frameset, I went with an Easton EC90X fork.  The EC90X is light and stiff, providing snappy and agressive handling as well as providing a strong base for braking.  I also like the look of the straight blade fork legs.  The fork attaches to the frame by way of a Chris King headset, there really aren’t too many legit options when it comes to headsets, it’s either a Chris King or disposable.
My Bars and Stem come from Oval Concepts, the 26mm aluminum bars are a size and shape that fits my hands well with just the right amount of drop and reach.  The matching aluminum Oval Concepts stem creates a pairing that is strong, stiff, and relatively lightweight.
The drive train is based around the SRAM Rival groupset and SRAM S300 Cross Specific Crankset with 46/38 chainrings.  Having been racing and training on SRAM since it was first introduced in 2007, I feel that the Rival level of components are the perfect balance of performance, weight, and cost.
Braking is taken care of by Paul Component Engineering’s Neo-Retro and Touring cantilever brakes.  Paul’s breaks are the most reliable and easiest to fine tune of all the cantilever brake options out there at the moment.  The wide pull Neo-Retro brakes on the front wheel for mud clearance and braking power and the low profile Touring brakes on the rear wheel so the calipars are out of the way for the constant dismounts and remounts involved in cyclocross.
My go-to pedals for cyclocross are the Crank Brothers Eggbeaters; easy-in-easy-out, fantastic mud shedding properties, light weight, and a four sided entry make these pedals a no-brainer!
For the saddle, I’m using Specialized’s off-road version of the saddle I use on all my road bikes, the Phenom.  The ergonomics and shape I depend on from the Toupe but in an off-road build.  The saddle is attached to the frame by the tried and true Thompson Elite seatpost.
One area of this bike that I am trying new for the first time are the Gore RideOn fully sealed derailleur cables.  The idea is a liner that runs end to end that keeps mud, sand, dirt, and water out, for a bike that’s going to be ridden through mud, sand, dirt, grass, and washed several times a week, it sounded like a good idea to me.
The whole package with carbon race wheels comes in at just over 18lbs, and in my biased opinion, it’s the perfect blend of light-enough-weight components that can take a beating and keep on performing for racing and training.

Posted by Maietta Factory Racer Dave Chiu

Deciding what components to hang on my new Maietta Steel Cyclocross Frame could have been a daunting task; there are so many options out there for drive trains, steering, saddles, pedals, etc… but after a few seasons of racing cyclocross and playing with several different component combinations, I’ve settled around a group of rock solid parts that I can rely on for training and racing.

Rounding out the frameset, I went with an Easton EC90X fork.  The EC90X is light and stiff, providing snappy and agressive handling as well as providing a strong base for braking.  I also like the look of the straight blade fork legs.  The fork attaches to the frame by way of a Chris King headset, can’t go wrong with King.

My bars and stem come from Oval Concepts, the 26mm aluminum bars are a size and shape that fits my hands well with just the right amount of drop and reach.  The matching aluminum Oval Concepts stem creates a pairing that is strong, stiff, and relatively lightweight.

The drivetrain is based around the SRAM 10 Speed Rival groupset and SRAM S300 Cross Specific Crankset with 46/38 chainrings.  Having made the leap to SRAM since it was first introduced in 2007, I feel that the Rival level of components are the perfect balance of ergonomics, performance, weight, and cost.

Braking is taken care of by Paul Component Engineering’s Neo-Retro and Touring cantilever brakes.  Paul’s brakes are super reliable and incredibly easy to fine tune.  The wide pull Neo-Retro brakes on the front wheel for mud clearance and braking power and the low profile Touring brakes on the rear wheel so the calipers are out of the way during the constant dismounts and remounts involved in cyclocross.

My go-to pedals for cyclocross are the Eggbeaters by Crank Brothers; easy-in-easy-out, fantastic mud shedding properties, light weight, and a four sided entry make these pedals a no-brainer!

For the saddle, I’m using Specialized’s off-road version of the saddle I use on all my road bikes, the Phenom.  The ergonomics and shape I depend on from the Toupe but in an off-road build.  The saddle is attached to the frame by the tried and true Thompson Elite seatpost.

One area of this bike that I am trying new for the first time are the Gore RideOn fully sealed derailleur cables.  The idea is a liner that runs end to end that keeps mud, sand, dirt, and water out, for a bike that’s going to be ridden through mud, sand, dirt, grass, and washed several times a week, it sounded like a good idea to me.

The whole package with carbon race wheels comes in at just over 18lbs, and in my biased opinion, it’s the perfect blend of light-enough-weight components that can take a beating and keep on performing for racing and training.

Photos coming soon!

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About davechiu

Cyclist, Photographer, Traveler, Developer, Designer, Dreamer, Geek, Friend.
This entry was posted in Completed Bicycles, Framebuilding. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Building #33, Dave’s Cross Bike

  1. ceager says:

    I wholeheartedly agree on the Paul brakes and Eggbeater petals. I’ve used other brakes, and the ability to make adjustments is unmatched. With previous brakes, I would always want to tune them minutes before the start, because they were so hard to get right, and I would invariably screw up the adjustment anyway, because it required three hands and some luck with needle-nose pliers. With the Pauls, you use a 15mm wrench and a 5mm hex key to make very precise, controlled changes.

    As for the Eggbeaters, I’ve never once biffed it on a dismount because I didn’t unclip properly. Considering my general lack of coordination, this is pretty astonishing. Easiness to unclip shouldn’t be confused with reliability. The very few times I’ve come unclipped when I don’t want to have been when my pedal strikes a rock, and the springs pop open.

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